Capitalization for Headlines – Dragoman Style

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Style, Translation_Tips

Here is another quick tip on capitalization. Our aim, as always, is to teach our audience at least one good trick in less than a minute. This time we are discussing capitalization of headlines. If you are involved in translation, copy-editing or proofreading or in general in publishing, you will find our posts very useful. Do not use ALL CAPS for headlines and headings! Use ONE of these styles instead: 1. Lower case, except for the first word and proper […]

Titles of Magazines, Newspapers, Journals – Capitalization

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Style, Translation_Tips, Word Usage

This piece is a part of our capitalization series. Proper capitalization in English is tricky. Stay tuned with our Language Tips for more. 1. If magazine or journal is part of the title, use upper case New York Magazine Journal of the American Medical Association 2. If magazine or journal is not part of the title, use lower case Time magazine 3. Capitalize the article the if part of the title of a newspaper, magazine, or journal The Washington Post […]

On Varying Sentence Length

Posted Posted in Sentences, Transcreation, Translation_Tips

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. This writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like struck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use the sentences of medium length. And […]

define/definition – Misused Words

Posted 1 CommentPosted in Translation_Tips, Uncategorized, Word Usage

This article series aims to eliminate usage errors and help non-native speakers to write clearly and fluently. We suggest that you always do proper research and use style guides effectively. For anything you are not sure of, feel free to ask us. Misused word define/definition Alternatives establish, lay down, set out, draft, establishment, drafting, design. Explanation In English, “define” means “to state the precise meaning of” (for example “we have already defined the meaning of control”). It does not mean […]

Industry vs Sector – Dragoman Style

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Style, Translation_Tips, Word Usage

Which one is correct? Industry is smaller, more focused, single business area. Sector is broader. A group of industries form a sector. In Turkish to English translations, authors mainly talk about industries and they use the word “sektör” in Turkish. As a rule, use industry in your translations and not sector, except for “public or private sector.”   Examples: healthcare industry              healthcare sector entertainment industry       entertainment sector banking industry                   banking sector […]

Translating content back to its original language – Notes from the Editor

Posted Posted in Editor Notes, Sentences, Translation_Tips

Notes from the Editor – January 2016 Could you be translating content back to its original language? When you are translating into English for a multinational company, make sure to check if the content was originally created in English. Because, without knowing it, you may be translating content back to its original language. In a globalized world, this is the case more often than not. The text you are translating into English could be about the products of the lighting […]

Dealing with quotations – Editor Notes

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Editor Notes, Style, Transcreation, Translation_Tips

Notes from the Editor – December 2015 How to deal with quotations When the text you are translating into English contains a quotation, and it is from a world-renowned figure, a well-known book, an article in an international newspaper or magazine, and so on, then you will likely find the original quotation in English. It’s that simple. You should translate the quote if, and only if, you are unable to find the quote in English. This principle applies to all […]

Branching – Editor Notes

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Editor Notes, Sentences, Translation_Tips

Notes from the Editor – May 2016 Branch to the right English is a subject–verb–object language. And it is considered a right-branching language. In right-branching sentences, the subject is described first, and is followed by modifiers that provide additional information about the subject. The prince raised the sword, clutching the hilt in both hands, grinning with madness. In left-branching sentences, however, modifiers are presented before the introduction of the subject and verb. We are kept in suspense. We get the […]

Sexism & Gender Neutrality – Editor Notes

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Editor Notes, Style, Translation_Tips

Notes from the Editor – April 2016 Using the singular “they” for gender neutrality English does not have a generic third-person pronoun, unlike, for instance, Turkish. This poses a problem when the person we refer to can be a male or a female. In the past, it was common to use pronouns he, him, and his when referring to persons of either sex. But “he” is no longer accepted as a generic pronoun; on the contrary, it is viewed as […]

Imperative Form – Editor Notes

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Editor Notes, Style, Translation_Tips

Notes from the Editor – March 2016 When to use the imperative form of a verb In some texts, for example, sets of instructions, web content, or advertising copy, it is more natural in English to address the reader directly using the imperative form of the verb. The source language of the text you are translating or editing may literally say that “you can” or “you may” do something in certain situations. However, it may not necessarily mean that you […]