Translating disabilities

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According to the AP Stylebook and several other guides, when writing about people with disabilities; Avoid using terms such as “handicapped” or “cripple.” Clearly define the type of disability if you can. If this is not possible, you can use “people with disabilities” or “disabled people.” Example: Inappropriate: Services for the handicapped and their families Use: Services for people with disabilities and their families   Avoid language that suggests pity such as “suffer from”, “afflicted with,” “victim of,” or “stricken with.” […]

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Hyphen, En Dash or Em Dash?

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Let’s clear up the confusion surrounding the use of hyphen, en dash and em dash. The hyphen (-) Dragoman follows the AP Stylebook, so we use hyphens to indicate ranges or to clarify that we are using a compound modifier. Please use no spaces before or after the hyphen. Examples: The first leg of the training was held in Şanlıurfa on May 22-23, 2019. Our state-of-the-art warehouse facilities are 80-percent automated. Each year, we endeavor to create a first-rate academic […]

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Translating content back to its original language – Notes from the Editor

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Notes from the Editor – January 2016 Could you be translating content back to its original language? When you are translating into English for a multinational company, make sure to check if the content was originally created in English. Because, without knowing it, you may be translating content back to its original language. In a globalized world, this is the case more often than not. The text you are translating into English could be about the products of the lighting […]

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5 Redundant Phrases to Avoid in Legal Translations

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“in light of the fact that,” “with regard to,” “under the provisions of…” These trite phrases often prevent your text to be clear and smooth. Translators are under the impression that legal texts require word-for-word translations. However, Dragoman prefers being loyal to the meaning, not to the cumbersome structure of source sentences. Here are five phrases that you can eliminate to improve your legal language skills: 1. “hereinafter referred to as” Just put the described phrase into parentheses and quotation […]

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Eliminating redundancy

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Eliminating redundancy is one of the key skills to fluency, but what is redundancy or a redundant word/phrase? If you can remove a word from a sentence without changing its core meaning, that word is redundant or unnecessary. Not every redundancy is a flaw, sometimes it is helpful to add variety to your sentences. The safest way to get rid of redundant phrase is to hire a professional copy-editor. Check out the following example, it is not only redundant but […]

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Dealing with quotations – Editor Notes

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Notes from the Editor – December 2015 How to deal with quotations When the text you are translating into English contains a quotation, and it is from a world-renowned figure, a well-known book, an article in an international newspaper or magazine, and so on, then you will likely find the original quotation in English. It’s that simple. You should translate the quote if, and only if, you are unable to find the quote in English. This principle applies to all […]

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Branching – Editor Notes

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Notes from the Editor – May 2016 Branch to the right English is a subject–verb–object language. And it is considered a right-branching language. In right-branching sentences, the subject is described first, and is followed by modifiers that provide additional information about the subject. The prince raised the sword, clutching the hilt in both hands, grinning with madness. In left-branching sentences, however, modifiers are presented before the introduction of the subject and verb. We are kept in suspense. We get the […]

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Sexism & Gender Neutrality – Editor Notes

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Notes from the Editor – April 2016 Using the singular “they” for gender neutrality English does not have a generic third-person pronoun, unlike, for instance, Turkish. This poses a problem when the person we refer to can be a male or a female. In the past, it was common to use pronouns he, him, and his when referring to persons of either sex. But “he” is no longer accepted as a generic pronoun; on the contrary, it is viewed as […]

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Imperative Form – Editor Notes

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Notes from the Editor – March 2016 When to use the imperative form of a verb In some texts, for example, sets of instructions, web content, or advertising copy, it is more natural in English to address the reader directly using the imperative form of the verb. The source language of the text you are translating or editing may literally say that “you can” or “you may” do something in certain situations. However, it may not necessarily mean that you […]

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Copy-editing tips for beginners

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When you first apply for a copy-editing position at Dragoman, you might assume your job will be limited with surface errors; it will be done after correcting spelling, prepositions and some connecting phrases. And when you realize that you are expected to change sentence structures, deal with proper usage and remove ambiguities, you may be struggling to figure out your limits. How far can I edit, where shall I begin from and where should I stop? I know exactly how you are feeling and am […]

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