Capitalization for Headlines – Dragoman Style

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Here is another quick tip on capitalization. Our aim, as always, is to teach our audience at least one good trick in less than a minute. This time we are discussing capitalization of headlines. If you are involved in translation, copy-editing or proofreading or in general in publishing, you will find our posts very useful. Do not use ALL CAPS for headlines and headings! Use ONE of these styles instead: 1. Lower case, except for the first word and proper […]

Capitalizing Disease Names

Posted Posted in Style, Translation_Tips

Do not capitalize disease names or medical terms. AP Style suggests that: “Do not capitalize arthritis, emphysema, leukemia, pneumonia, etc. When a disease is known by the name of a person or geographical area identified with it, capitalize only the proper noun element: Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Ebola virus, etc.” Capitalization is tricky even for native speakers. You can learn why Ebola is capitalized and further explore capitalization topic here.    

Capitalizing Non-Proper Nouns

Posted Posted in Style, Translation_Tips

We translate a lot of press releases, agreements, websites, and disclosures that are filled with words like board of directors, company, general manager. Capitalizing these words should be an exception rather than the rule. Unless an agreement or a contract contains a clause that reads “hereinafter to be referred to as “The Company” or “Company,” we need not capitalize the word “company,” or any other word like “board of directors” or “general manager” for that matter. Likewise, we need not […]

Capitalization Troubleshooting

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Key points: Do not use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required. Academic degrees are capitalized only when the full formal degree title is used. Academic specialties are not capitalized. Job titles are capitalized only when the formal title is used, preceding a person’s name. Terms in legal documents are an exception, but must be clearly defined. Cut the capitals One of the most common (not to mention time-consuming) issues we face when translating and editing is the consistent […]