On Varying Sentence Length

Posted on Sentences

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. This writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like struck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use the sentences of medium length. And […]

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Dealing with quotations – Editor Notes

Posted on Editor Notes

Notes from the Editor – December 2015 How to deal with quotations When the text you are translating into English contains a quotation, and it is from a world-renowned figure, a well-known book, an article in an international newspaper or magazine, and so on, then you will likely find the original quotation in English. It’s that simple. You should translate the quote if, and only if, you are unable to find the quote in English. This principle applies to all […]

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Copy-editing tips for beginners

Posted on Editor Notes

When you first apply for a copy-editing position at Dragoman, you might assume your job will be limited with surface errors; it will be done after correcting spelling, prepositions and some connecting phrases. And when you realize that you are expected to change sentence structures, deal with proper usage and remove ambiguities, you may be struggling to figure out your limits. How far can I edit, where shall I begin from and where should I stop? I know exactly how you are feeling and am […]

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What is the difference of Gold Translation?

Posted on Localisation

Dragoman Gold refers to translation + editing + proofreading as specified in international translation quality standards. But so does Dragoman Plus. So what is the difference of Gold and Plus? And also what exactly is Dragoman Standard? The biggest difference of Gold Translation Level is full review; Standard or Plus does not include full copy-editor review. Standard translation includes translation + full QA and industry-specific terminology management. Dragoman’s QA is not only automated QA but also a mechanical review or […]

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Standard Translation – What does it mean for Dragoman?

Posted on Style

Dragoman offers three service levels in translation: Standard, Plus and Gold. We advertise these three levels. Is it just a marketing gimmick or a value-addedproposal? When pronounced together, one easily feels that standard is good, plus is better and gold is super. But what is exactly included in a standard service? Can you and should you buy this service for all your needs? Of course not. Let’s start with GOLD If you have a creative website or brochure, or you need to submit […]

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A structural approach to translation quality

Posted on Language Technologies

When I first started translating as a Turkish to English translator, my quality criteria was to understand the document, find the right terminology and send the translation on time. Seriously, it was a huge effort on my side to understand the text. I don’t know how many nights passed with little if any sleep to meet the next urgent job’s deadline. Judging by the posts of junior translators on Facebook, I think young colleagues are going through a similar path. […]

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“That” or “Which”?

Posted on Localisation

Do you know when to use ‘that’ or ‘which’? Also known as restrictive and non-restrictive clauses. Many people aren’t even aware of the differences, but there are. Use ‘that’ with restrictive clauses and ‘which’ with non-restrictive. Take a look at this example: Wood that is strong generally makes a good material to build furniture. (Restrictive) The use of “that” restricts the sentence to the kind of wood you’re discussing. In this case, it’s only strong wood. Wood, which is strong, generally makes a good […]

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Sentence Splitting Part 2

Posted on Editor Notes

Editor’s note: first read the guide to the basics of sentence splitting (Part 1). The below example is based upon an actual translation but is not unique. It is typical to Turkish English translations and not rare in other Eastern languages. Original translation:  Located in Peru, Machu Picchu, which is 2,430 meters (7,970 ft) above sea level and can be reached by train or by foot, via the legendary Inca Trail, is a 15th-century Inca site that has been called […]

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Sentence Splitting Part 1

Posted on Localisation

One of the most common issues we deal with when editing texts translated from Turkish is overly long sentences. The trait is often carried over from the source text, as Turkish texts tend to use what are – to native English speakers – improbably long sentences. Long sentences make it difficult for the reader to comprehend the text. Breaking up a sentence can make text easier to digest and less tiring for the reader. When should a sentence be split? […]

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